Friday Fictioneers 100 Words: Kaylee, Benji and KB

Thanks for the link at Friday Fictioneers!

 

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Image: Copyright Sean Fallon

Almost alone on a semi-deserted junk world, Kaylee badly missed her beloved Benji-dog.

But she’d finally found a new friend within the scrap heap.

The dusty robot gratefully consumed all the batteries she’d scrounged. He sucked thoughtfully on each one, his red headlamp eyes growing brighter, and his spiny fingers twitched and rusty claws flexed.

“KB is ready,” KB finally announced in a scratchy, staccato voice.

“So we can play?” she said.

“Yes, Kaylee.” said KB. “What shall we play?”

Razor sharp teeth chomped the last cell.

“I have a great game,” she grinned, “Huntin’ the varmints who murdered Benji!”

*****

Find more Friday Fiction 100 word stories below!

Friday Fictioneers 100 Words: Kaylee, Benji and KB

Surrealism and food

Because I can’t believe I’ve only just heard about Leonora’s work over the last couple of months, and this is a fabulous article contrasting her approach (which feels contemporary with Frida Kahlo meets Chagall) compared with the more ‘macho’ surrealists.

Surrealism and food

COMMENTARY: The Art World’s Self-Serving Lies

“William Blake, one of the greatest artists of all time, understood the connection. “The foundation of empire is art and science remove them or degrade them and the empire is no more — empire follows art and not vice versa as Englishmen suppose.” Empire in this sense doesn’t refer to a specific form of government but more so a culture, the authority of a way of thought, a sense of shared values. Our post modern friends would refer to this as a hegemony.”

THE REMODERN REVIEW

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image by Scott Adams

BEING SMOTHERED IN THEIR OWN TANGLED WEBS: BBC News Roger Scruton’s “How Modern Art Became Trapped by its Urge to Shock”

Key quote from the article, a summary of how the contemporary art world conspires to inflate inferior productions and specious reputations:

“Originality requires learning, hard work, the mastery of a medium and – most of all – the refined sensibility and openness to experience that have suffering and solitude as their normal cost.

“To gain the status of an original artist is therefore not easy. But in a society where art is revered as the highest cultural achievement, the rewards are enormous. Hence there is a motive to fake it. Artists and critics get together in order to take themselves in, the artists posing as the originators of astonishing breakthroughs, the critics posing as the penetrating judges of the true avant-garde.

“In this way Duchamp’s famous urinal…

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COMMENTARY: The Art World’s Self-Serving Lies

ARTICLE: Tracey Emin, 1984, and the Cult of Celebrity

Whilst I can see some interesting things about the YBA (not so young anymore…), this also makes some very valid points about the doublethink required to appreciate them…and whether it”s finally had its time, Very interesting article on the state of art today.

THE REMODERN REVIEW

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ARTICLE: Tracey Emin, 1984, and the Cult of Celebrity

Monster Monday: ‘”Gashunk gashunk”‘…. Juni Ito’s ‘Gyo’ Manga

Lovecraftian weirdness from the fantastic horror manga of Junji Ito. Oh, and it’s a giant shark on legs..

The Haunted Eyeball

There are plenty of reason to love Junji Ito’s work.

We’re about to cover just one of them, which should be more than enough for now…

Juni Ito’s manga is unfailingly horrific, disturbing and marvelous. If you love horror of any kind, we can’t recommend his back-catalogue highly enough. For the sake of this Monster Monday, however, we want to focus on his series GYO (The Death Stench Creeps)
and the disturbing, and mostly unexplained, phenomena that it tries to explain. Well, there is a rational explanation given. In the loosest possible sense of ‘rational’. Perhaps ‘plausible’ is the best description for what happens in this manga. It’s really dream logic, which makes it work, the sense of a nightmare you can’t quite climb away from and situation getting worse and worse.

Title page from the first manga novel. Fish with legs. Yes, it sounds silly...at first.... Title page from the first manga novel. Fish with legs. Yes, it sounds silly…at first….

The basic premise of the…

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Monster Monday: ‘”Gashunk gashunk”‘…. Juni Ito’s ‘Gyo’ Manga

Beacon

Beautiful images, beautiful words of classic poetry. Sustenance through art.

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O grace abounding, whereby I presumed
. .So deep the eternal light to search and sound
. .That my whole vision was therein consumed!

In that abyss I saw how love held bound
. .Into one volume all the leaves whose flight
. .Is scattered through the universe around;

How substance, accident, and mode unite
. .Fused, so to speak, together, in such wise
. .That this I tell of is one simple light.

Yea, of this complex I believe mine eyes
. .Beheld the universal form – in me,
. .Even as I speak, I feel such joy arise.

— Dante Alighieri, il Paradiso, Canto XXXIII

Wash sketches of me by Eleni Papageorge, created at Spring Studio:

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Beacon

Monster Monday: The Pantomime Cat

The scariest thing in the world…when you’re an impressionable six year old…and it’s all Enid Blyton’s fault.

The Haunted Eyeball

Welcome back Eyeballers! Monster Mondays, and new articles, return to the slightly revised Haunted Eyeball.

But first, the terror!

It’s not typical for Enid Blyton to be the harbringer of nightmares, but thinking back to our youth, one of her books was responsible for a great deal of dread, angst and nightmares.

Whilst trying to think back to the things that really, truly wigged us out as a child, we suddenly come across the worst thing in the world.

The rather unkindly named ‘Fatty’ gets a nasty shock. Sure, you find out LATER it’s only a criminal in a cat suit….but some images are meant to stay with you.

(Image from a rather awesome Enid Blyton site. If you need to remember something Blyton based, go here).

Why this image is terrifying.

It contains almost all the elements required to freak out an over-imaginative six year old.

  • An oversized…

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Monster Monday: The Pantomime Cat

Procrastination

Just…awesome article, especially for writers…anyway, back to work !

You Are Not So Smart

The Misconception: You procrastinate because you are lazy and can’t manage your time well.

The Truth: Procrastination is fueled by weakness in the face of impulse and a failure to think about thinking.

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Netflix reveals something about your own behavior you should have noticed by now, something which keeps getting between you and the things you want to accomplish.

If you have Netflix, especially if you stream it to your TV, you tend to gradually accumulate a cache of hundreds of films you think you’ll watch one day. This is a bigger deal than you think.

Take a look at your queue. Why are there so damn many documentaries and dramatic epics collecting virtual dust in there? By now you could draw the cover art to “Dead Man Walking” from memory. Why do you keep passing over it?

Psychologists actually know the answer to this question, to why you keep…

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Procrastination

Interview: Nicky Peacock – author of Bad Blood

Fab interview with Nicky Peacock, writer of London-based vampire vs zombie novel ‘Bad Blood’.

The Haunted Eyeball

Nicky Peacock is a British author living in the UK and has had short stories published/ being published in five countries: UK, USA, Canada, Ireland and Australia. She writes horror, paranormal romance and supernatural YA fiction. She’s also dabbled in Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Paranormal Noir, Urban Fantasy and Dystopia. Most of her work is available through Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. She runs a local writers’ group called Creative Minds  and you can get in touch with her through the website or on her facebook page and also on Library Thing  and Twitter. Her first sole author book ‘Bad Blood’ is available through Noble & Young and is reviewed on the Haunted Eyeball here. She’s a proud member of the UK’s Society of Authors. Catch up with Nicky and her work on her Blog

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Interview: Nicky Peacock – author of Bad Blood