Book Review: Townhouse, a Tale of Terror by Brian Rowe

A review of excellent author Brian Rowe’s horror thriller ‘Townhouse’ – Interview coming soon!

The Haunted Eyeball

Today the Eyeball reviews Brian Rowe’s LA based horror/thriller,Townhouse: A New Adult Thriller.Brian has also been interviewed on the Eyeball here.

Sara is a would-be writer based in LA, who has found herself living with, and sort-of engaged to, the father of her unborn child, even though she barely knows him. The reluctant couple are making the best of it, and even move into an upscale Townhouse together, although they’re both conflicted about their committment. While her fiancé strives to reach the top at his agency, Sara struggles to write a bestseller, and make sense of her decisions, while stuck at home alone. Then the local disappearances start to rack up, and she comes to suspect that another inhabitant of the townhouse block might be hiding a deadly secret. Of course, she just has to investigate behind closed doors and that opens up a whole new…

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Book Review: Townhouse, a Tale of Terror by Brian Rowe

Monster Mondays: Doctor Who’s Whisper Men

Monster Mondays – Doctor Who’s newest horrors!!

The Haunted Eyeball

At the Eyeball we have a soft spot for Doctor Who, even though the increasingly convoluted plots and two Doctors on a perpetual sugar rush have led to more of a ‘dipping in’ strategy when it came to actually watching it.

However, once we heard that a certain horror icon was guest starring, we tuned in this time. We won’t spoil who that was here, as the whole internet can tell you what happened – or watch it on the BBC iPlayer if you can. The episode was stronger than earlier ones with a leisurely start that perfectly laid out what was at stake, with an impressive group of female heroes setting the scene.

But what we’ve come to comment on were the gloriously nasty new monsters known as the Whisper Men.

One of the Whisper Men

The Whisper Men are sinister henchmen for an ongoing Big Bad, played with sneery superiority by Richard E…

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Monster Mondays: Doctor Who’s Whisper Men

Monster Mondays: Ray Harryhausen’s Skeleton Warriors

RIP Ray Harryhausen. A homage to his most fearsom creations, the Skeleton Warriors, and a gratuitous mention of Army of Darkness by Sam Raimi.

The Haunted Eyeball

We were all saddened to hear that Ray Harryhausen had passed away last week, and here on the Eyeball we’d like to pay homage to some of his most famous monsters, created with the painstaking technique of stop-motion. Using real life sculpted models. Animators and monster fans, we have lost a great artist in film-making and the Eyeball would like to dedicate this Monster Monday entirely to him.

However, the great man left us many fantastic beasts to choose from. After a brief Twitter poll earlier today, and a little searching on YouTube, the top Harryhausen monster, the Eyeball has decided that the finest creation of them all are, unquestionably, the relentless animated skeleton warriors from Jason and the Argonauts (1966).

Technically outstanding even today, the only way our hero can even escape them is by throwing himself off a cliff! They dispatch Jason’s two companions with leering grins…

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Monster Mondays: Ray Harryhausen’s Skeleton Warriors

Monster Monday: Clive Barker’s Nightbreed – Cabal Cut

Monster Monday – Clive Barker’s uncannily beautiful Nightbreed (1990) and some thoughts on the reissue of the full cut version.

The Haunted Eyeball

Cabal was written in what could be termed the original ‘heyday’ of Clive Barker’s horror reign. Clive Barker is best known for the tricksy Cenobites and the ruthless Candyman, but Cabal presented a brilliantly realised clutch of monsters who were actually the victims and  living as refugees from the harsh prejudices of the modern world. With their numbers depleted, the monsters took shelter underground, in the appropriately named graveyard of Midian, in an effort to avoid further destruction from frightened humans. Although you would be a fool if you weren’t a little afraid of the creatures, the point is that the world is a poorer place without their glorious strangeness. It’s a bit like angle taken later by the X-Men movies, only a lot more visceral.

The essence of Cabal’s story was adapted into the movie Nightbreed, the new title which is actually a collective term for the…

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Monster Monday: Clive Barker’s Nightbreed – Cabal Cut